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With Atlantic Computer Solutions by your company's side, you never have to stress about tech again. With ACS as your partner, you have the opportunity to:

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Curious about what kind of IT support ACS offers? Keep reading to learn more about some of our most common services.

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Technology doesn't only help companies perform quicker and more efficiently. It provides security against hackers, viruses, malicious actors, and human errors. It saves you money and time through streamlined processes. But it can also be a huge distraction from your business goals and dreams. That's especially true when you try to solve complicated IT issues on your own. As your IT management company, ACS supplements your business with real-deal expertise, so you don't stray from your ultimate vision.

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If you find that your company needs IT support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, it's time to contact ACS. We provide cost-effective, pragmatic IT outsourcing solutions customized to your business needs. That way, you don't have to take out another line of credit just to keep your data safe and your business up-to-date.

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If you're looking for an IT support company with the kind of diverse skillsets to address complex business challenges, look no further than ACS. From cloud hosting and VOIP help to computer repair and new business technologies, Atlantic Computer Services combines national-level know-how with reliable local service.

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A few of our network installation and support services include:

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Performance Optimization

With years of network IT support experience, we've learned to spot performance issues early so our team can resolve them before they affect your business. As part of our cyclical performance audits, we evaluate benchmark tests, resource-usage trends, and capacity analysis to measure your server's ability to handle traffic and any projected spikes or lulls in productivity.

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Infrastructure Monitoring

Detecting issues with servers and networks early on minimizes threats to your network's performance and protects your business data. That's why we're monitoring your network 24/7. We're looking for problems with your connectivity, system performance, database response time, access speeds, and network utilization. To put it simply, we keep track of every aspect of your network, so you get the most out of your infrastructure.

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Swift Emergency Support

By monitoring your networks every day and night of the year, we can detect issues swiftly and implement an equally fast response and solution. That way, your systems get back online ASAP.

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Troubleshooting

Servers and networks fail all the time, whether it's from hardware problems or software incompatibility. When that happens, your services often come to a halt. ACS relies on our years of experience to quickly discover network issues so that we can apply a permanent fix.

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What is Network Security from Atlantic Computer Services?

You know the adage that says, "A chain is only as strong as its weakest link?" The same can be said for computer networks. In today's digitally-dominant world, your network computers are only as secure as their most vulnerable entry point. Unfortunately, modern scammers and hackers only need one hole in your defenses to ruin everything you've worked so hard to create.

From ransomware and Trojan horse strategies to viruses and malware, cyberattacks are usually destructive by nature and can wreak havoc on your company's sensitive data, processes, privacy, and productivity.

Network security services from ACS are designed to provide your business with iron-clad protection. We accomplish that mission by using innovative tools and best practices to predict, monitor, and prevent network breaches that expose privileged data to hackers.

At ACS, we understand that true network security isn't something that you can just "set and forget." It's not a series of random solutions - it's robust, proactive, and carefully tailored to your company. Our ongoing network security services in Folly Beach act as castle walls rather than rickety old fences, giving you peace of mind knowing your business has a professionally-designed security infrastructure.

When you trust ACS with your network security, you benefit from:

  • Customized, Extensive, Proactive Network Defense Strategies
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Atlantic Computer Services: An IT Provider You Can Trust

If you're searching for the capabilities of an IT department but don't have the time to manage such an undertaking, Atlantic Computer Services is the perfect fit for your business. ACS provides a flexible computer services support team to augment your daily and ongoing IT needs. Unlike some companies, our onsite and remote IT support exceeds service-level agreements with on-call, local live helpdesk support.

Instead of one-and-done engagements, we prefer to nurture long-term business relationships built on trust and hard work. If you're looking for reliable IT help at cost-conscious prices, look no further than Atlantic Computer Services. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help your business stay successful and secure.

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Latest News in Folly Beach, SC

As Nicole approaches, erosion is the big concern at Folly Beach

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - When Hurricane Ian stormed through the Lowcountry in September, it left Folly Beach’s erosion defenses wiped out, clearing the way for Tropical Storm Nicole to continue the assault on the coastline. The city is now requesting help to restore beach erosion.Residents have come to the beach throughout the day to see the damage as high tides Thursday morning came up all the way to the sand dunes, an area that is normally very dry.“A large concern in that request is the lack of storm protection...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - When Hurricane Ian stormed through the Lowcountry in September, it left Folly Beach’s erosion defenses wiped out, clearing the way for Tropical Storm Nicole to continue the assault on the coastline. The city is now requesting help to restore beach erosion.

Residents have come to the beach throughout the day to see the damage as high tides Thursday morning came up all the way to the sand dunes, an area that is normally very dry.

“A large concern in that request is the lack of storm protection and flood mitigation in place to buffer from another hurricane,” Nicole Elko, coastal consultant for Folly Beach, said. “Folly Beach has little to no capacity to withstand additional erosion from another storm. Fortunately, the dune system is robust along most of the island and that will help protect the upland infrastructure.”

With a high tide on Thursday of 8.63 feet the Folly River bridge, the effects from Nicole are already visible. The city’s director of public works, Eric Lutz, says between Ian and Nicole, portions of the beach are now completely gone at certain points of the day.

With Nicole, the beach has very little capacity to withstand storms, which means less beach for everyone.

“So now we’re going to be looking at lots of areas on the beach where anywhere it’s not low tide, you won’t have any beach to hang out on,” Lutz said. “There will be variants on that but anywhere, probably east of the washout, is going to be pretty severe so you’ll have beach maybe between half of the cycle between tides.”

Lutz says the amount of beach comes and goes. He says this is not the worst erosion he has ever seen.

Lutz says large concrete slabs, known as groins, were installed on the beach around the Folly Beach Pier back in the 90s. They were designed to catch the sand and create sand dunes. Before the storms, those groins were completely covered by sand except for a few feet of exposed concrete painted yellow. Now the storms have whisked away enough sand to expose 15 feet of concrete.

The city tells me this is a groin placed here in the 90s to help catch sand and build the beach. Before #Ian and #Nicole the only visible part was the yellow tip. There are several other groins like this along the beach. #wx #beach #erosion #chsnews @Live5News https://t.co/sFsPolGq2d

— Nick Reagan (@NickReaganLive5) November 10, 2022

Elko says the city is already in the process of requesting federal emergency rehabilitation assistance from Ian impacts. Lutz says he hopes to get new sand on the beach by 2024.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Folly Beach officials to assess erosion caused by Nicole on Monday

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — Nicole brought rain, choppy waves, and wind to Folly Beach on Thursday.To some, the storm was a surprise."We flew in for the vacation yesterday," said one visitor from New York. "We flew in at 10, and we didn’t know there was a tropical storm, so we made the best of it in Charleston."Come Friday morning, it was business as usual.Construction continued on the Folly Pier, with crews hoping to stay on time and have the new pier open by the spring of 2023....

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — Nicole brought rain, choppy waves, and wind to Folly Beach on Thursday.

To some, the storm was a surprise.

"We flew in for the vacation yesterday," said one visitor from New York. "We flew in at 10, and we didn’t know there was a tropical storm, so we made the best of it in Charleston."

Come Friday morning, it was business as usual.

Construction continued on the Folly Pier, with crews hoping to stay on time and have the new pier open by the spring of 2023.

While there was no significant damage to any buildings, Mayor Tim Goodwin said there is significant beach erosion.

The mayor said that erosion will be surveyed on Monday because of the holiday on Friday.

"There’s definitely been more erosion and change in the dunes, especially since we have been here over the last few weeks," said Leah Sin, who is visiting from North Carolina. "We have come out at high tide and low tide all the time."

Sin and her kids, Remy and Sully, were checking out the beach after the storm. They have been staying at Folly for the last few weeks.

"We were already here and – it was a little unexpected. We weren't sure how to navigate it, because we don’t deal with a lot of storms," said Sin.

Some people on the beach were walking, others enjoying a cup of coffee. But most were just taking in the views.

A few surfers caught some waves, and one lifeguard we caught up with was going for a swim.

"It wasn’t my intention to swim, but I had to check it out," said one vacationer. "It was a little bit rough out there. Not so much that it will pull you out."

The storm definitely did not ruin the vacation for the people we spoke with.

"This is a dream come true. This is our favorite place," said Sin.

"With my string of luck, this is my second tropical storm on my second vacation this year. So, you have to make the best of it," said another vacationer.

From Myrtle Beach to Hilton Head, expect coastal erosion possible from Nicole

Another storm means more worry.Coastal South Carolina is bracing for another round of erosion, just over a month after surge from Hurricane Ian damaged dunes and washed away sand from several beaches along the Atlantic Ocean.Large breaking waves up to 6 feet from Tropical Storm Nicole — which made landfall in Florida as a hurricane and is expected to weaken to a tropical depression before its core passes over South Carolina — are expected for parts of the coast until early Nov. 12. The rush could lead to significant...

Another storm means more worry.

Coastal South Carolina is bracing for another round of erosion, just over a month after surge from Hurricane Ian damaged dunes and washed away sand from several beaches along the Atlantic Ocean.

Large breaking waves up to 6 feet from Tropical Storm Nicole — which made landfall in Florida as a hurricane and is expected to weaken to a tropical depression before its core passes over South Carolina — are expected for parts of the coast until early Nov. 12. The rush could lead to significant erosion on beaches that aren’t equipped to handle much more.

Ann Wilson has worked as a park ranger for Myrtle Beach State Park since 1994. She said Ian’s dune destruction was the worst she has seen, even worse than Hurricane Matthew, which hit as a reduced Category 1 in 2016.

“If we had an Ian right now, everybody’s in trouble,” Wilson said.

She likened the protective role of sand dunes in storms to the role of offensive linemen protecting the quarterback in a football game.

“Sand dunes are our first line of defense against storms, wind and waves,” Wilson said. “The sand dunes did their job during Ian. It was a really rough game, and a lot of our players went out on injured reserve. If we had a Super Bowl tomorrow, we’re barely going to show up.”

After Hurricane Hugo decimated the dunes in 1989, regrowth efforts took place along the coastline. But Ian destroyed 20 to 30 feet of sand dunes off the park’s shoreline, which equate to decades’ worth of regrowth.

Because Nicole is not expected to hit the coast as directly or as forcefully as Ian, Wilson said she does not anticipate many issues related to flooding beyond areas where flooding typically occurs during storms, like in Garden City or Cherry Grove in North Myrtle Beach.

“The dunes will rebuild, but it’s not up to us on a timeframe,” Wilson said.

The U.S. Geological Survey said 55 percent of South Carolina’s dunes are forecast to face some level or erosion and about one percent could become inundated.

Pawleys Island, bordered to the west by Pawleys Creek and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, saw several feet of storm surge brought on by Ian that washed sand and debris into the roads and collapsed the Georgetown County town’s pier.

Nicole’s march toward the Upstate on its way to the mid-Atlantic region and beyond brought street-level flooding during high tide the morning of Nov. 10, with similar flooding seen on the Charleston peninsula.

Subsequent high tides on Pawleys Island should be less severe, said Town Administrator Daniel Newquist.

“I think it’s what we anticipated,” Newquist said. “We anticipated, during the high tide period, water coming over the creek bank and into the roadways.”

Newquist said he planned to inspect the town’s beaches during the afternoon low tide. In an email to island property owners, he said the town is “certainly” concerned about the potential for beach erosion so soon after Ian.

Of beach damage from Ian, Newquist said “fairly significant” erosion occurred and that beach renourishment undertaken in previous years was vital in protecting seaside properties. The Army Corps of Engineers began surveying the sands of Pawleys Island days after Ian’s landfall.

“We’re going to leverage whatever resources are available to us to get the beach back in good shape, but we did get a decent start, I think, with the dune repair work that’s been done with our contractor,” Newquist said.

Folly Beach also lost a good bit of sand during Ian. And the city had already hit its renourishment triggers prior to the storm, said Eric Lutz, the city’s director of building, facilities and public works.

But Lutz said the Charleston County beach should be OK during Nicole.

“There will just be less of it to sit on at each high tide,” he said in an email.

Flooding from Ian was mostly under elevated houses on the east end of the island and the marsh side.

The city also expected flooding on the back of the island from Nicole. To prep, staff was checking storm drains and putting barricades and cones in place for possible road closures.

Nicole Elko, president of Elko Coastal Consulting, said Folly Beach has little to no capacity to withstand additional erosion from another storm. She is working as a coastal consultant for the city.

“Fortunately, the dune system is robust along most of the island, and that will help protect the upland infrastructure,” Elko said.

The city is in the process of requesting federal emergency rehabilitation assistance, partly because of the lack of storm protection and flood mitigation in place to buffer from another hurricane, Elko said.

Other beaches in the Lowcountry also noted damage to dunes and loss of sand during Ian, but they weren’t particularly worried this time around.

“We’re not really doing anything to prevent that situation other than warning residents to be careful if they go in the ocean,” said Andy Benke, Sullivan’s Island town administrator.

Officials in Kiawah Island and Edisto Beach said they did not see measurable impacts from Ian.

Although coastal erosion wasn’t a big issue on Hilton Head Island either, the town started preparing for Nicole this week by removing beach mats, wooden trash bins and umbrella boxes up to the dune lines in beach areas.

Town officials reported high tide coupled with storm surge on Nov. 10 brought “considerable flooding” along some roads and island beaches. Along with flooding, officials warned residents about beach erosion, rough surf and dangerous rip currents.

Nicole Ziege contributed from Myrtle Beach and Mike Woodel from Georgetown County.

Hurricane Wire is a pop-up newsletter during hurricane season that delivers anyone who lives on the East Coast all the information they need to know as storms brew in the Atlantic and beyond.

The Edge of America: The Perfect Fall Getaway In Folly Beach

One of the best things about Folly Beach is that it offers something for everyone. It has a relaxed, family-friendly vibe while at the same time offering a great selection of fun beach bars and nightlife. Its frequent festivals and events also have an atmosphere that is suited for all ages.It's always a great time to visit Folly Beach, but fall is one of the most delightful seasons for a weekend on the edge of America. See why now is the perfect time to plan a weekend getaway to Charleston's favorite ...

One of the best things about Folly Beach is that it offers something for everyone. It has a relaxed, family-friendly vibe while at the same time offering a great selection of fun beach bars and nightlife. Its frequent festivals and events also have an atmosphere that is suited for all ages.

It's always a great time to visit Folly Beach, but fall is one of the most delightful seasons for a weekend on the edge of America. See why now is the perfect time to plan a weekend getaway to Charleston's favorite neighboring barrier island.

Why Visit Folly Beach In The Fall?

First and foremost, the weather is wonderful, but there is a fraction of the crowd. While temperatures are still toasty, it isn't quite so sweltering. The heat index in the summer is frequently over 100 degrees, with very high humidity. Expect fall temperatures to be in the 70s - 80s instead, with the ocean remaining warm enough for swimming too.

During the summer, traffic is often an utter nightmare; it can take hours to even get onto the island and find a parking space. By the time September rolls around, the crowd has thinned significantly, and it's smooth sailing. The beach itself also isn't so densely packed, so there is more room to spread out without being towel-to-towel with other beachgoers.

Finally, fall in the Lowcountry means the return of the oyster season, and Folly is full of the freshest shellfish offerings thanks to its surrounding marshland. The area is referred to as the 'Napa Valley of Oysters', and the local oysters are sought after nationwide; try them straight from the source!

Be sure to visit the iconic Bowen's Island restaurant, which has been serving up the daily haul of oysters and other local seafood straight from its docks since 1946.

Fido-Friendly: Folly Beach Dog Rules

From 1 May - 30 September, dogs are prohibited on the beach between the hours of 10 am - 6 pm. After September 30, Fido is welcome to hit the beach anytime; another point for Folly Beach in the fall!

The entire island very much caters to dogs. There is a slew of pet-friendly vacation rentals and numerous restaurants with pet-friendly patios. There is also a public dog park on the island where they can play.

What To See And Do In Folly Beach

Clocking in at only 12 square miles and the majority of the off-the-beach action is concentrated on Center Street. The majority of Folly Beach businesses are locally-owned establishments rather than chain retailers, adding to the strong sense of community.

The shops stock more than just run-of-the-mill beach souvenirs; there are many local artisans who sell their handcrafted items too. Besides clothing and beach goods, there are also surf shops, massage and yoga studios, and a thriving restaurant and bar scene.

Located a block over from Center Street sits Bert's Market, which deserves a special shout-out. Bert's is a Folly Beach institution, adhering to its slogan of ´we may doze, but we never close.' That's right, Bert's is open around the clock. Bert's vibe can't quite be described with words, but the funky little corner store will quickly become a daily go-to. It also has a full-service deli, hot food bar, ice-cream counter, and a great selection of beer and wine.

With its small size, Folly Beach offers great walkability (especially in the pleasant fall weather). In fact, there are even walking history tours of the island and the Morris Island lighthouse.

Those wishing to leave the car parked at the rental (or leave it behind altogether) have other options for getting around too. Bicycles, mopeds, and golf carts can all be rented on the island and make getting around a breeze (plus, they're a ton of fun).

Hitting the sand is super simple in Folly Beach, thanks to its ample beach access points. There is public access to every single block along the island, and on-street parking is free in most places. Just make sure all four wheels are off of the road (that includes golf carts, too) in order to avoid a ticket.

Folly Beach is known for having some of the best surfing in the southeast. Advanced surfers can head to the washout section of the beach, and novices can take a lesson from one of the several reputable surf schools on the island:

For those who want something a bit more relaxed, the coastline is also littered with shark teeth. Take a stroll at the low side and keep your eyes peeled for teeth hidden in among the sand and shells.

Another great way to enjoy Folly Beach and the surroundings is by boat. Take a sunset sailboat, booze cruise, fishing charter, or rent kayaks and explore the inlets all around the island.

While there are dozens of delicious options to choose from, here are some of the perennial crowd favorites to suit a variety of tastes:

Where To Stay In Folly Beach

Another perk of a fall getaway to Folly Beach is the low-season accommodation rates. Most rentals offer considerable discounts after the peak summer season.

While there are only two actual hotels on Folly Beach (The Tides and Folliday Inn), there is a huge selection of vacation rentals to suit all tastes and budgets. There are oceanfront condos, large, modern houses, and funky beach shacks reminiscent of a bygone era. There are also riverfront homes with private docks for anyone looking to bring the boat along. Besides Airbnb, there are numerous vacation rental offices on the island that can help to find the perfect rental while also providing tons of local insight and island recommendations.

Finally, it is worth mentioning that many short-term vacation rentals on the island become available for monthly rentals from September onwards (usually until March/April). So for anyone looking for an extended stay, fall is also an excellent time to lock in a seasonal rental.

Army Corps of Engineers begin assessing Hurricane Ian erosion to beaches

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - Recovery from Hurricane Ian continues across the Lowcountry, and at the beaches, the Army Corps of Engineers is working to assess any erosion damage.After any tropical storm or hurricane, the Army Corps of Engineers will come out to the affected beaches and map out the impact that the storm may have had and make a plan for how to fix it. Then, the corps compares the map to older models to see if a beach suffered erosion and needs more sand placed.Folly Beach Mayor Tim Goodwin says the city has a worki...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - Recovery from Hurricane Ian continues across the Lowcountry, and at the beaches, the Army Corps of Engineers is working to assess any erosion damage.

After any tropical storm or hurricane, the Army Corps of Engineers will come out to the affected beaches and map out the impact that the storm may have had and make a plan for how to fix it. Then, the corps compares the map to older models to see if a beach suffered erosion and needs more sand placed.

Folly Beach Mayor Tim Goodwin says the city has a working relationship with the corps year-round to keep track of the information, but they always touch base after a major event.

“We’ve been assessing the beach for the last 12 months, you know when is it going to be time for renourishment again,” Goodwin says. “This will probably push it up after they do the survey today and go back and look at all the information and see where we are at this point in time.”

Surveyors and geographers used a machine called the RAMbL Sunday afternoon to take measurements and assess Folly Beach. The RAMLDR uses a light detecting and ranging tool to map beaches.

Sonja Zindars is the Chief of Survey and a Geographer at the corps. She says the RAMbLr has been used for the past 10 years as an efficient way to gather data on the sand.

“It sends out a pulse of light continuously as it’s moving and it measures that light coming back and can tell us what the elevation of the full beach is,” Zindars explains.

Matther Bols is an engineering technician at the corps. He drives the four-wheeled vehicles with the devices across the sand.

“We’re interested in the dune area, the berm,” Bols says. “So we’ll start to travel up next to the dune then down along the water/shore interface. So it will be a complete model from where the water touches the beach up to the top of the dune.”

Corps members can compare the assessment to past models of the beaches, and if there is significant erosion, they can make a plan for replenishing the essential islands.

“Folly Beach is a barrier dune and it is our first line of defense,” Zindars says. “These beaches provide protection, and this primary dune, to all the infrastructure that is on the island, but also the infrastructure behind it.”

The corps is scheduled to assess Myrtle Beach and Pawleys Island later in the week. The corps also had a team survey the Charleston Harbor early Saturday morning before it re-opened, taking similar data measurements.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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