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With Atlantic Computer Solutions by your company's side, you never have to stress about tech again. With ACS as your partner, you have the opportunity to:

  • Get an expert IT support consultant without overspending on in-house IT help
  • Keep your most sensitive business data secure and backed up
  • Create scalable technology infrastructure
  • Streamline your business transactions and processes
  • Boost business productivity
  • Minimize network system downtime

Curious about what kind of IT support ACS offers? Keep reading to learn more about some of our most common services.

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Helping Your Dreams Turn Into Reality


Technology doesn't only help companies perform quicker and more efficiently. It provides security against hackers, viruses, malicious actors, and human errors. It saves you money and time through streamlined processes. But it can also be a huge distraction from your business goals and dreams. That's especially true when you try to solve complicated IT issues on your own. As your IT management company, ACS supplements your business with real-deal expertise, so you don't stray from your ultimate vision.

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Your Answer to Full-Time IT Support


If you find that your company needs IT support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, it's time to contact ACS. We provide cost-effective, pragmatic IT outsourcing solutions customized to your business needs. That way, you don't have to take out another line of credit just to keep your data safe and your business up-to-date.

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If you're looking for an IT support company with the kind of diverse skillsets to address complex business challenges, look no further than ACS. From cloud hosting and VOIP help to computer repair and new business technologies, Atlantic Computer Services combines national-level know-how with reliable local service.

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A few of our network installation and support services include:

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Performance Optimization

With years of network IT support experience, we've learned to spot performance issues early so our team can resolve them before they affect your business. As part of our cyclical performance audits, we evaluate benchmark tests, resource-usage trends, and capacity analysis to measure your server's ability to handle traffic and any projected spikes or lulls in productivity.

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Infrastructure Monitoring

Detecting issues with servers and networks early on minimizes threats to your network's performance and protects your business data. That's why we're monitoring your network 24/7. We're looking for problems with your connectivity, system performance, database response time, access speeds, and network utilization. To put it simply, we keep track of every aspect of your network, so you get the most out of your infrastructure.

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Swift Emergency Support

By monitoring your networks every day and night of the year, we can detect issues swiftly and implement an equally fast response and solution. That way, your systems get back online ASAP.

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Troubleshooting

Servers and networks fail all the time, whether it's from hardware problems or software incompatibility. When that happens, your services often come to a halt. ACS relies on our years of experience to quickly discover network issues so that we can apply a permanent fix.

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What is Network Security from Atlantic Computer Services?

You know the adage that says, "A chain is only as strong as its weakest link?" The same can be said for computer networks. In today's digitally-dominant world, your network computers are only as secure as their most vulnerable entry point. Unfortunately, modern scammers and hackers only need one hole in your defenses to ruin everything you've worked so hard to create.

From ransomware and Trojan horse strategies to viruses and malware, cyberattacks are usually destructive by nature and can wreak havoc on your company's sensitive data, processes, privacy, and productivity.

Network security services from ACS are designed to provide your business with iron-clad protection. We accomplish that mission by using innovative tools and best practices to predict, monitor, and prevent network breaches that expose privileged data to hackers.

At ACS, we understand that true network security isn't something that you can just "set and forget." It's not a series of random solutions - it's robust, proactive, and carefully tailored to your company. Our ongoing network security services in Isle of Palms act as castle walls rather than rickety old fences, giving you peace of mind knowing your business has a professionally-designed security infrastructure.

When you trust ACS with your network security, you benefit from:

  • Customized, Extensive, Proactive Network Defense Strategies
  • Secure Data Transfers
  • Full-Service Security Solutions
  • PCI and HIPPA Compliance
  • Enhanced Network Stability
  • Reduced Risk of Cyberattacks
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Atlantic Computer Services: An IT Provider You Can Trust

If you're searching for the capabilities of an IT department but don't have the time to manage such an undertaking, Atlantic Computer Services is the perfect fit for your business. ACS provides a flexible computer services support team to augment your daily and ongoing IT needs. Unlike some companies, our onsite and remote IT support exceeds service-level agreements with on-call, local live helpdesk support.

Instead of one-and-done engagements, we prefer to nurture long-term business relationships built on trust and hard work. If you're looking for reliable IT help at cost-conscious prices, look no further than Atlantic Computer Services. Contact our office today to learn more about how we can help your business stay successful and secure.

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Latest News in Isle of Palms, SC

'The only alternative is hospice': Radical interventional radiology procedure saves UK patient

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2022) — Ron Bird was out of options.His blood was filled with ammonia, poisoning the rest of his body. He was in and out of the hospital for two years, comatose from the effects of the ammonia. His kidneys were shutting down. His heart was weakened. His brain was in a constant fog. It was suggested that his husband, David, begin looking into hospice care.Ron had issues with his liver all his life. He was born with a cyst in his liver, reducing its functioning capacity by about two-...

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 3, 2022) — Ron Bird was out of options.

His blood was filled with ammonia, poisoning the rest of his body. He was in and out of the hospital for two years, comatose from the effects of the ammonia. His kidneys were shutting down. His heart was weakened. His brain was in a constant fog. It was suggested that his husband, David, begin looking into hospice care.

Ron had issues with his liver all his life. He was born with a cyst in his liver, reducing its functioning capacity by about two-thirds. Later in life, he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma and while chemotherapy saved his life, it essentially destroyed what was left of his liver.

“It was a perfect storm,” Ron said. “They set me up for a liver transplant. I was very sick and needed a transplant right away.”

That liver lasted about five years before Ron’s body began rejecting it. In 2015, he traveled from his home in Knoxville to the UK Transplant Center for his second transplant. After speaking with Malay Shah, M.D., surgical director of the liver transplant program, they knew that this time, things were going to be different.

“It was the perfect liver,” Ron said. “Dr. Shah said it was the best possible liver.”

But there was a problem. The years of liver disease took a toll on the liver’s major blood vessels. The portal vein, the vessel that carries blood from the spleen, pancreas and intestines to the liver was completely blocked.

“Rather than connect the donor portal vein to Ron’s portal vein, we had to connect the donor portal vein to the inferior vena cava,” said Shah. “This is a completely unconventional way to connect the portal vein, but unfortunately the only option in Ron.”

For the next five years, this solution worked like a charm. Aside from an occasional bout of illness, Ron and David traveled regularly to the Isle of Palms in South Carolina where they would ride bikes along the beach, to New Mexico for David’s work and Abingdon, Virginia, for the Barter Theater. They moved to Washington, D.C., for David’s job and in January of 2020, where they got married in the National Cathedral.

But then Ron’s health took another turn.

“I was often waking up in the hospital,” Ron said.

“He would go into what I call an ammonia coma,” David said. “It would be a matter of hours. He would go from talking and interacting and then be completely out of it. He would end up in the ICU and wake up a couple of days later. This happened six or seven times in the span of two years.”

Each time, the levels of ammonia in Ron’s blood were dangerously high. He was having frequent seizures. In 2020, the cumulative effects of illness took a toll on his heart, and he had to have one valve replaced and two repaired and a pacemaker implanted. His kidneys were in trouble as well. By December of 2021, Ron wasn’t getting any better. He was maxed out on all possible medication and there were no options left.

“I was at wit’s end,” Ron said. “I said, I can’t live like this, to be just constantly waking up in the hospital.”

Ron’s new liver wasn’t the problem — it was working perfectly. So, Shah and the rest of the transplant consulted Roberto Galuppo, M.D., in UK HealthCare’s interventional radiology to check whether the connections made during the liver transplant were still working.

“Initially, on the scans, the connection looked ok,” said Galuppo. “But with time, the inferior vena cava below the constriction essentially gave up, and the blood flow was not going into the liver.”

Ron developed hepatic encephalopathy, a serious disease in which the liver struggles to remove toxins from the bloodstream. In a healthy liver, the portal vein carries waste products from the gut into the liver where they are detoxified, neutralized and excreted. Since Ron’s portal vein was damaged from his prior illnesses, the transplant team had to make new connection using the vena cava, the main blood vessel that carries the filtered blood away from the liver to the heart. This new connection forced blood into the liver to be filtered. It worked for seven years, but the pressure was too much and the flow was reversed — the unfiltered, ammonia-laden blood was being recirculated through the rest of his body.

“It’s fairly uncommon to have situations where a portal vein is clogged to the point where we can’t remove the clot during surgery,” said Shah. “Unfortunately, Ron’s portal vein was completely gone.”

Looking at Ron’s CT scans, Galuppo had an idea.

“We knew this wasn’t a liver issue, it was essentially a plumbing issue,” said Galuppo. “So what if we force the blood coming in from the gut into the liver by artificially creating this connection? Since the blood is flowing into the vena cava, what if we poke a hole in the portal vein and place a shunt and redirect this blood flow. Unfiltered blood was draining into the renal vein, so we close that and force the blood through this new conduit.”

The only problem was Galuppo couldn’t find any record of a procedure such as this. In theory, it would work, but he couldn’t pitch his idea to Ron and David with any statistics or success stories.

“It was risky, but we were confident the stent would hold,” Galuppo said. “I explained the plan to David, who said, 'The only alternative is hospice, so let’s try it.'”

With the help of Chadi Diab, M.D., Merve Ozen, M.D., and the rest of the talented interventional radiologists and staff, Galuppo performed this innovative procedure in December 2021 with remarkable and almost immediate results.

“It started working immediately,” David said. “He had some other issues that kept him in the hospital for a long time, but he hasn’t had an ammonia problem since then.”

Galuppo presented the results of the procedure at the conference of the Society of Interventional Radiology during a session of extreme radiological procedures.

“It was a session where they only present unique cases, where you’re pulling 'Hail Marys' and doing procedures that you wouldn’t normally do to try and save people,” said Galuppo.

Impressed with the results of Galuppo and his team, editor-in-chief for the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Ziv Haskal, M.D., invited Galuppo to write a book chapter regarding this procedure for his book “Extreme IR.” Ron is now the textbook definition of interventional radiology ingenuity.

Recovering at home in Knoxville, Ron is looking forward to a trip to the beach. For the first time in a long time, he and David can finally make travel plans.

“It’s amazing,” said Ron. “It’s a miracle. Every time I talk to Dr. Galuppo, I say that he, my donor, Dr. Shah, Dr. Leyson, Dr. Sekala, physician assistant Hender Rojas and all the nurses are my heroes.”

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers." We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

Isle of Palms prepares for late season storm

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — As Hurricane Nicole makes its way to the Lowcountry, officials along the coast are concerned about possible beach erosion.In September, Hurricane Ian left its mark on the Isle of Palms.“Lot of debris, for sure. Beach erosion was not so bad with Ian, and we’ll keep our fingers crossed for Nicole coming up. But a lot of debris, trees down, flooding in our hotspots," says Philip Pounds, the mayor...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — As Hurricane Nicole makes its way to the Lowcountry, officials along the coast are concerned about possible beach erosion.

In September, Hurricane Ian left its mark on the Isle of Palms.

“Lot of debris, for sure. Beach erosion was not so bad with Ian, and we’ll keep our fingers crossed for Nicole coming up. But a lot of debris, trees down, flooding in our hotspots," says Philip Pounds, the mayor of Isle of Palms.

In preparation for Nicole, IOP's Public Safety team surveyed the beaches.

“Our public safety folks did some drone footage earlier this week just to kind of have a base line for a pre-storm view, and then they’ll do a post probably Saturday when the storm clears out just to see if we have any erosion," continued Mayor Pounds.

The direction of the storm is also causing some concern.

“Didn’t have any issues with Ian. This one, again, since we’re on the other side of the storm, there’s certainly heightened concerns. But hopefully by the time it gets here, we’re talking 30 to 40 mile per hour winds mostly and storm surge of a couple of feet. Hopefully that won’t do too much, but we’ll probably have some issues," said Mayor Pounds.

Nicole is expected to bring heavy winds, rain, and possible isolated tornadoes, which is why Mayor Pounds is assuring the public he's preparing for the worst.

"We’ve pulled off all the trash cans that sit out on the beach for beachgoers. We’ll have some public safety personnel this week," Mayor Pounds says.

His main message is to be cautious.

“As we saw with Ian, the past changes pretty regularly and a few miles makes a big difference. This one seems pretty certain as far as the cone as where it’s going so, but certainly for residents just stay plugged in wherever you get your news from," said Mayor Pounds.

We also checked in with Sullivan's Island town officials. They say they will continue to keep an eye on the beaches, but no emergency evacuation order has been issued.

A LOOK BACK: Kats, Tigers sectional final of 1975 remains vivid in mind's eye

One of the most-anticipated boys basketball games in Howard County history has become almost Woodstock-like in terms of legend and vacillating attendance figures.All these years later, there are people who weren’t shoehorned inside a frenzied Memorial Gym on that March evening in 1975 who’ll swear up and down they were.“I was right behind the Kokomo pep club. Those kids never sat down, so I stood the entire game,” one longtime hoops fan will offer, his or her imagination adding voice to the sectional cha...

One of the most-anticipated boys basketball games in Howard County history has become almost Woodstock-like in terms of legend and vacillating attendance figures.

All these years later, there are people who weren’t shoehorned inside a frenzied Memorial Gym on that March evening in 1975 who’ll swear up and down they were.

“I was right behind the Kokomo pep club. Those kids never sat down, so I stood the entire game,” one longtime hoops fan will offer, his or her imagination adding voice to the sectional championship game between the Wildkats and the state’s only undefeated team at the time, the 21-0 Northwestern Tigers.

“Oh, yeah,” someone else might chime in. “Remember how Northwestern didn’t come out for pregame warmups until the 16- or 17-minute mark to heighten the suspense?”

How do they know? It’s called nearly 48 years of stories, embellished or otherwise, making the rounds.

The buildup was weeks in the making. The Tigers-Kats were country vs. city, small vs. large, farm fields vs. concrete and brick, and, yes, NHS coach Steve David vs. Goliath (47-time sectional titlist Kokomo, coached by Carl McNulty).

Locals couldn’t get enough debating if Kokomo’s core of 6-foot-5 Tico Brown, forward Tim James and junior guard Tim McFarland could withstand Northwestern’s trio of perimeter marksmen — seniors Craig Sutherland and Randy Crowe and velvety junior Steve Sewell.

First, the annual sectional draw had to oblige.

It did with the Tigers drawing a bye and needing only a win over Maconaquah in the semifinal to make it to the championship game. Kokomo’s path would require defeating Western and then gaining revenge on bitter rival Haworth for a regular-season loss to make a KHS-NHS showdown a reality.

Done, done and done.

In those days, Memorial Gym promoted its seating capacity as 6,800.

The Northwestern-Kokomo showdown may or may not have raced past that number depending on the fire marshal’s mood. The building was, at minimum, full. This included fans of the other county school programs and Haworth who immediately shifted their allegiances to become part of the Tigers’ bandwagon.

Sectional bracketing forced the Kats to wear their eye-grabbing red uniforms on their home court. Thus, in virtually every way possible, it had become to seem like a home game for Northwestern.

Until the game started, that is.

The Wildkats dominated early, leading 21-10 after one quarter and 39-20 at halftime.

Led by the play of senior center Tom Oren and junior forward Brian Hudson, Northwestern, which by then had switched to a man-to-man defense, began slowly chipping away at the lead, paring the margin to seven, 59-52, with three minutes remaining in the final quarter.

It was then the ear-splitting noise ricocheting off the Memorial Gym rafters and walls had the old girl threatening to shake free from her foundation.

Kokomo remained poised, however, spreading the floor and converting free throws to win, 68-56.

Ron Barsh, an assistant under McNulty for 15 seasons (1970-1984), feels the Wildkats playing its usual unforgiving North Central Conference schedule during the regular season made all the difference.

“Had we played [Northwestern’s] schedule, we might have been 20-0, and had they played our schedule they might have been 13-7,” said Barsh, who became Kokomo’s athletic director when Kokomo and Haworth merged prior to the 1984-1985 school year. “We got better by playing better competition.

“But Northwestern had a really good team. There were so many people in Howard County who loved basketball. The atmosphere that night was unbelievable.”

Brown and James each scored 20 points for the Kats, senior forward Kevin Abney 11 and McFarland 10. Northwestern was led by Sutherland’s 19 with Crowe and Hudson adding 12 and 11 points, respectively.

David, 78, who now lives in Isle of Palms, South Carolina, with his wife, Carly, was a junior player at Eastern when the 1961 Comets lost to eventual state champion Kokomo, 76-41, in a sectional semifinal inside the very same building.

That, he said, was special. What transpired 14 years later qualified as next-level.

“That’s maybe the neatest atmosphere I’ve ever been in. Just the intensity,” said David. “Back in those days when the small schools went up against the big school, you might be able to sneak up on them.

“We couldn’t do that. Our players were a little bit tight in the beginning, and I don’t blame them. I probably was, too. The comeback we made … that showed the kind of character we had. The grittiness. I really loved those guys.”

Asked if he would have preferred the four-class postseason system of today during the 1974-1975 season, David, aware his third and final Tigers ball club might have won a state championship, pauses for a few seconds.

“No,” he said. “I think I would keep the memories just the way they are.”

Isle of Palms Is the Coastal Getaway of the Summer

The South Carolina barrier island just 30 minutes from Charleston may just be the area’s best-kept secret.Swaths of uninterrupted white-sand beach, the smell of salty spray, warm sun on your skin, and the rustle of palm fronds gently blowing in the wind—these are the sights, sounds, and scents of Isle of Palms. The South Carolina barrier ...

The South Carolina barrier island just 30 minutes from Charleston may just be the area’s best-kept secret.

Swaths of uninterrupted white-sand beach, the smell of salty spray, warm sun on your skin, and the rustle of palm fronds gently blowing in the wind—these are the sights, sounds, and scents of Isle of Palms. The South Carolina barrier island packs a lot of relaxation and big fun into a vacation destination that's just seven miles long and one mile wide. The island's proximity to Charleston (just 18 miles by car), make it a preferred summer hideout for locals. An abundance of vacation rentals and the iconic Wild Dunes resort have been drawing visitors from across the country since the early 1970s.

With the deep blue Atlantic on one side and marshy creeks of the Intracoastal Waterway on the other, Isle of Palms offers the best of the Lowcountry and the beach in one stunning setting that's begging to be added to your vacation calendar.

Six of Isle of Palms' seven total miles are occupied by public beaches, which means you'll have your pick of the litter when looking for a sandy spot where you can post up for the day—or the week. Once you've staked your claim, all the normal beach activities are yours for the choosing, from splashing around in the surprisingly calm seas to building the ultimate sandcastle or playing a game of beach volleyball. For families, the Isle of Palms County Park, located in the middle of the island's coastline, is ideal. The public beach has lifeguards, outdoor showers, chair and umbrella rentals, restrooms, and even a playground for little ones retreat to once they tire of the sun and surf.

Make the most of a visit to Isle of Palms by scheduling a charter to take you offshore. Get your sea legs at the Isle of Palms Marina, where you can easily rent a boat and spend a day exploring the island's bays and waterways. Fishing charters are plentiful and offer both reef fishing and Gulf Stream fishing. For adventure enthusiasts or wildlife lovers, Barrier Island Eco Tours hosts a range of naturalist-guided tours that take visitors through winding salt marshes, tidal creeks, and the Intracoastal Waterway on the way to uninhabited Capers Island. Animals you might see along the way include loggerhead turtles, bottlenose dolphins, and every shape and size of coastal birds.

Breakfast is noteworthy at Sea Biscuit Café. The tiny beachside shack has been dishing out delicious morning meals since 1968. While they offer all the classics, the daily specials are where the magic happens. Past offerings have included chocolate banana challah French toast, lemon lavender pancakes, and tomato pie.

When you need a mid-day refuel for the whole family, Coconut Joe's is the obvious choice. Located on Isle of Palms' main drag, you won't have to venture far to get fresh seafood and impeccable vibes. The open-air covered deck is the ideal spot for munching on the restaurant's namesake shrimp, while rocking sandy toes and sun-bleached hair. When happy hour hits, venture to the rooftop bar for a frozen cocktail or painkiller. Nothing will put you on island time faster.

By the time you're finally ready to come in from the sun and go out to dinner, Isle of Palms will be waiting with plenty of options. The Boathouse and Acme Lowcountry Kitchen are island staples that have stood the test of time thanks to excellent quality food and good old-fashioned Southern hospitality. For a special night out, try Coda del Pesce, a fine dining restaurant that specializes in Italian with lots of influence (and fresh catch) from the nearby seas.

All trips to Isle of Palms must include at least one visit to The Windjammer at Front Beach. The legendary local music venue is known for its incredible live shows, stellar views of the water, cold drinks, and unbeatable fried pickles.

The obvious choice for places to stay in Isle of Palms is Wild Dunes Resort, a 1,600-acre family-friendly resort that offers everything from rooms and suites at two inns, to private beach condos and home rentals. In addition to a more-than-comfortable stay, the resort also features several resort-style pools, a spa, and two championship golf courses.

If you're hoping for a cozier stay, the newly renovated Palms Oceanfront Hotel consists of 68 modern rooms with gorgeous views of the sparkling Atlantic. There are also plenty of rentals through Airbnb and VRBO for everything from multifamily waterfront homes to one-bedroom condos.

Whether you book for a long weekend or stay for an entire week, the memories and magic of Isle of Palms will stay with you for months and years to come—maybe even until you have a chance to make another trip back!

Hurricane Ian Takes Aim at South Carolina Coast (2PM Advisory)

The center of Ian is making landfall with life-threatening storm surge, damaging winds, and flash flooding lashing the Carolinas.The latest speed/position:LOCATION...33.2N 79.1WABOUT 55 MI...90 KM ENE OF CHARLESTON SOUTH CAROLINAMAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...85 MPH...140 KM/HPRESENT MOVEMENT...N OR 0 DEGREES AT 15 MPH...24 KM/HMINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...977 MB...28.85 INCHESWATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:A Storm ...

The center of Ian is making landfall with life-threatening storm surge, damaging winds, and flash flooding lashing the Carolinas.

The latest speed/position:

LOCATION...33.2N 79.1W

ABOUT 55 MI...90 KM ENE OF CHARLESTON SOUTH CAROLINA

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...85 MPH...140 KM/H

PRESENT MOVEMENT...N OR 0 DEGREES AT 15 MPH...24 KM/H

MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...977 MB...28.85 INCHES

WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for...

* Savannah River to Cape Fear North Carolina

* Neuse River North Carolina

* St. Johns River Florida

A Hurricane Warning is in effect for...

* Savannah River to Cape Fear North Carolina

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for...

* Altamaha Sound Georgia to Savannah River

* Cape Fear to Duck North Carolina

* Pamlico Sound

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for...

* North of Cape Fear to Duck North Carolina

* Pamlico River

* Cape Fear River

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for...

* East of Cape Fear to Surf City North Carolina

At 200 PM EDT (1800 UTC), the center of Hurricane Ian was located near latitude 33.2 North, longitude 79.1 West. Ian is moving toward the north near 15 mph (24 km/h). Ian is forecast to turn toward the north-northwest by tonight and will move inland across eastern South Carolina and central North Carolina tonight and Saturday. Maximum sustained winds remain near 85 mph (140 km/h) with higher gusts. Ian should weaken rapidly after landfall soon and transition into a post-tropical cyclone overnight. Ian should dissipate over western North Carolina or Virginia late Saturday. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 275 miles (445 km). A WeatherFlow station at Morris Island Lighthouse recently reported sustained winds of 75 mph (120 km/h) with a gust to 82 mph (131 km/h).

The estimated minimum central pressure is 977 mb (28.85 inches)

STORM SURGE: The combination of storm surge and the tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters moving inland from the shoreline. The water could reach the following heights above ground somewhere in the indicated areas if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide.

* Isle of the Palms to Little River Inlet...4-7 ft

* Little River Inlet to Cape Fear...3-5 ft

* Savannah River to Isle of the Palms...2-4 ft

* Cape Fear River...2-4 ft

* East of Cape Fear to Duck, including Pamlico and Neuse

Rivers...2-4 ft

* Flagler/Volusia County Line to Savannah River...1-2 ft

* Albemarle Sound...1-2 ft

WIND: Hurricane conditions are occuring within the Hurricane Warning area in South Carolina and southeastern North Carolina soon. Tropical storm conditions are occurring in parts of the warning areas on the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas, and hurricane conditions are possible within the Hurricane Watch area in North Carolina by this afternoon.

RAINFALL: Ian is expected to produce the following storm total rainfall:

* Northeast South Carolina: 4 to 8 inches, with local maxima of 12

inches.

* Central South Carolina, North Carolina, and southern Virginia:

3 to 6 inches with local maxima of 8 inches

Major-to-record river flooding will continue across central Florida through next week. Considerable flash and urban flooding, and minor river flooding is possible across coastal and northeast South Carolina, coastal North Carolina and southeast Virginia today. Locally considerable flash, urban, and small stream flooding is possible today into early Saturday across portions of northwest North Carolina and southwest Virginia. Limited flooding is possible across portions of the southern Mid-Atlantic this weekend.

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